Kurt Bell

A life of courage, joy and independence.

Stately Japan Abandoned Farmhouse

Stately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan Home
Stately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan Home
Stately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan HomeStately Abandoned Japan Home
Stately Abandoned Japan Home

Stately Japan Abandoned Farmhouse, a set on Flickr.

Here are some photos of a splendid old farm compound in the area where I was hiking yesterday. The house has been deserted for at least five years. The house remains in remarkably good (looking) condition from the outside though the garden and courtyard have completely returned to nature. The fact that the home remains in such good condition without care is testament to the remarkable quality of materials and craftsmanship applied during construction. If we could only look inside we might be astounded by what we could see. Large, dark pillars likely rise from the foundation to support a lattice of huge beams formed of raw tree limbs which bend and twist in interconnected form. The family may have raised silk worms in the attic and it’s possible the kitchen is an earthen-floored doma with a raised section of tatami nearby where the family would have dined. It’s also possible that the bath is an old-style cast iron, wood-fired basin. In it’s time this compound must have been one of the most important structures in the village, now given up and slowly fading from memory even as the village’s older residents gradually leave.

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This entry was posted on July 12, 2012 by in Uncategorized.
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